Apple iOS 7

How exciting is the iOS 7 camera app?

June 11 , 2013 by: Daniela Bowker Equipment, News

Apple iOS 7

Whilst everyone else is arguing about whether the new flat design and Crayola coloured icons that comprise iOS 7 are genius or travesty, shall we take a look at what’s been updated, reshuffled, and introduced camera-wise?

Taking on an iPhotos feel, photos are now automatically organised into ‘moments’. It’s a twee name for a fairly neat concept: images are sorted and labelled geographically and temporally using their metadata. This will let you search photos you’ve taken in one particular location by date. It’s a more sophisticated digital version of having holiday albums sorted by year and place, with each photo captioned; you can see all the photos from one place organised by date, too.

Airdrop will allow you to drop an image into someone else’s iPhone over the same wi-fi network. If we can Airdrop to other devices, for example a MacBook Air, that’d be neat.

Photo Stream already allowed you to share with your friends and for you to comment on their streams; now you can insert your photos into their shared streams, creating a collective album.

Moving between camera, video, panorama mode, and the square crop feature is managed by a swipe. Yes, you read that right, there’s a square shooting mode built into the camera app, along with a range of filters. It feels like a dreadful disease that afflicts smartphones. With any luck, it’s a childhood illness and everyone will grow out of it soon.

The conclusion? There’s nothing revolutionary or even exceptionally exciting here. It feels more like a consolidation of features and in some respects even a game of catch up. That’s not to say that sharing images via Airdrop isn’t a welcome addition, it’s just that it isn’t setting alblaze the world of mobile photography.

About Daniela

This post was written by Daniela Bowker, who has written 1382 articles for Photocritic

Daniela has written three books on photography, contributed to several others, and acted as the editorial consultant on many more.

Her newest book, Social Photography, is currently available as a digital download as well as in bookshops in the UK and US.

You might also want to check out her exploration of other-worldly photographic creations, Surreal Photography: Creating the Impossible, and Photo School Fundamentals, for which she contributed the section on composition.

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